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Blueprint For Academic Brilliance
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Preparing Students For A Global Future

We at Glendale believe education works best when curriculum, teaching, learning and assessment are closely aligned. This belief inspires the design of each aspect of the curriculum, given by the Cambridge programme. We believe in the maxim “think globally, act locally.” Cambridge gives the liberty to schools to shape a curriculum based on the framework provided and around how they want students to learn, with a wide choice of subjects and flexible ways to offer them. This programme inspires students to love learning while helping them to discover new abilities and a wider world.

  • Prepares students for life, helping them develop an informed curiosity and a lasting passion for learning.
  • Helps students to get equipped withthe 21st century skills to learn and acquire knowledge, individuallyor collaboratively, and to apply these skills and knowledge accordingly acrossa broad range of areas.
  • Supports learning that provides international content while catering to local requirements and interests.
  • Encourages diversity and flexibilityin teaching methods
  • Provides appropriate forms of assessment and international benchmarking.
We embrace the Cambridge programme across the grades to support the development of learners who are
  • Confident - in working with information and ideas – their own and those of others
  • Responsible - for themselves, responsive to and respectful of others
  • Reflective - as learners, developing their ability to learn
  • Innovative - equipped for new as well as future challenges
  • Engaged - intellectually and socially, ready to make a difference
As the Cambridge learner attributes suggest, we encourage students to reflect on their learning, so they can articulate where they are in the learning process, and plan and control their learning strategies.

The Cambridge learner attributes also provide a cross-curricular language and set of expectations for all students and teachers to engage with.
Cambridge International offers a wider range of subjects and encourages high academic standards through a practical approach to teaching and learning. When compared with other national curricula, Cambridge International is a balanced curriculum and a flexible course of study as it has an international outlook and is tailored for multi-cultural groups across the globe.

Our team believes that good teaching and learning incorporates and reinforces a subject’s key concepts to help learners gain:
  • Expertise - Greater depth and breadth of subject knowledge and mastering the basics for success in the 21st century
  • Application - Learners apply the knowledge and skills in new situations.
  • Grit - Grit is about persevering and not giving up easily,  doing multiple drafts of work until the desired quality is reached and having a growth mindset – a belief that effort rather than innate ability matters most.
  • Oracy - Learners need to be able to talk in a range of settings and styles, using awide vocabulary with fluency.
  • Spark of Curiosity - Learners develop the habit ‘questioning’ in a deeper and wider sense.
Active learning’ is described as a classroom approach which acknowledges that learners are active in the learning process by building knowledge and understanding, in response to learning opportunities provided by their teacher.

This is in contrast to the outdated model of instruction whereby knowledge isimparted or transmitted from the teacher to students. Cambridge emphatically says that active learning is anapproach in which learners take an increasing responsibility for theirlearning, and that teachers are enablers and activators of learning, ratherthan lecturers or deliverers of ideas.

‍Other approachesand terminologies that are associated with active learning include:
  • Student-centered, or learner-centered learning, where students play an active role in their learning, with the teacher as an activator of learning, rather than an instructor
  • Enquiry-based, problem-based or discovery learning, where learners learn by addressing and posing scientific questions, analyzing evidence, connecting such evidence to pre-existing theoretical knowledge, drawing conclusions, and reflecting upon their findings.
  • Experiential learning, which broadly describes one’s learning from a direct experience
Evidence indicates that excessive focus on examination results restricts teaching to be bound within the framework of the test, and reduces the extent to which active, student-centered learning is adopted.

Our ethos which focuses on student learning, rather than simply attainment, is essential in enabling teachers to avoid an ‘exam factory’ mentality but to foster learners’ greater enjoyment and ownership of their own learning.
We recognise that assessment has two important roles:to prove and improve – to prove what students are learning, and to suggest how they can improve their understanding and skills.

Our assessments enable effective differentiation of student performance, across units and over time. We design our assessments to be fair, valid, reliable and practicable.

For assessment to work well, the questions used to test students’ understanding need to have been designed well, too. This is as true for formative assessment and ‘assessment for learning’ as it is for summative assessment and ‘assessment of learning’.

Scheme of Assessments

For assessment to work well, the questions used to test students’ understanding need to have been designed well, too. This is as true for formative assessment and ‘assessment for learning’ as it is for summative assessment and ‘assessment of learning’.
  • Formative assessments (or Assessment for Learning)help learners to focus on the aim of the elements of their learning. This can help them understand what constitutes ‘excellence’, take responsibility for their own learning and plan how they might move forward.
  • Summative Assessment (or Assessment of Learning) at the end of a unit of study can provide valuable evidence of a student’s achievement.